Chiron Publications Blog

Audiobooks now available!

Storytime with Robert
by Robert A. Johnson
Now Available in Audiobook!
Robert A. Johnson was more than an international best-selling author of 15 books, brilliant and influential Jungian analyst, and acclaimed international lecturer; he was a master storyteller. This audiobook is a direct recording of Robert’s own tellings of these stories, remastered for improved quality. Robert told these stories, his favorites, to an appreciative and revering community each night at Journey into Wholeness events from 1981 to 2001. Robert collected several of these stories in his beloved India, but the audiobook includes stories and myths from Chinese, Native American, Mexican, and European traditions. Each story is introduced by a colleague, mentee, or friend whose life was profoundly changed by the presence and teachings of this wise and other-wordly sage.

Robert taught us we could enjoy a myth or a story as a child would, or we could listen more carefully to discover a road map for our own inner work. Magical, humorous, tragic, enigmatic, these stories illustrate Robert’s capacity to speak to the delights and adversities of the human experience, and to our collective quest to become our most conscious and authentic selves.
Audiobooks also available at Chiron Publications:

Robert A. Johnson, best-selling author of He, She, We and other psychology classics, shares a lifetime of insights and experiences in this easy-to-listen-to explanation of psychological projection – seeing traits in others that are, in fact, our own. He masterfully reveals how each of us gives up our inner gold to those whom we idealize or are attracted to. Each one of us must learn the arduous task of “taking back” this gold as we move through life’s journey.

Drawing on early Christianity, medieval alchemy, depth psychology, and the myths of the Flying Dutchman and the Once and Future King, he also explores the subjects of loneliness, fundamentalist religion, and the spiritual dimensions of psychology.

One of the most influential and visionary analysts of his generation, Johnson follows the tradition of Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell among those whose ideas have shaped our deepest metaphors of self and psyche. His books are known worldwide for presenting Jung’s complex theories with the simplicity and grace.
Prisms: Reflections on the Journey We Call Life summarizes a lifetime of observing, engaging, and exploring why we are here, in service to what, and what life asks of us. These 11 essays, all written recently, examine how we understand ourselves, and often we have to reframe that understanding, the nature and gift of comedy, the imagination, desire, as well as our encounters with narcissism, and aging.

James Hollis, Ph.D., a Jungian Analyst in Washington, D.C., explores the roadblocks we encounter and our on-going challenge to live our brief journey with as much courage, insight, and resolve as we can bring to the table.
In Hauntings, James Hollis considers how we are all governed by the presence of invisible forms – spirits, ghosts, ancestral and parental influences, inner voices, dreams, impulses, untold stories, complexes, synchronicities, and mysteries – that move through us through history. He offers a way to understand them psychologically, examining the persistence of the past in influencing our present, conscious lives and noting that engagement with mystery is what life asks of each of us. From such engagements, a deeper, more thoughtful, more considered life may come.
 
James Hollis, Ph.D., a Jungian Analyst in Washington, D.C., explores the roadblocks we encounter and our on-going challenge to live our brief journey with as much courage, insight, and resolve as we can bring to the table.
 
Dr. Murray Stein’s prolific career has produced a substantial body of writings, lectures, and interviews. His writings, captured in these volumes, span a wide domain of topics that include writings on Christianity, individuation, midlife, the practice of analytical psychology, and topics in contemporary society. His deep understanding of analytical psychology is much more than an academic discourse, but rather a deeply personal study of Jung that spans nearly half a century.

The unifying theme of the papers collected in this volume is the individuation process as outlined by C.G. Jung and adopted and extended by later generations of scholars and psychoanalysts working in the field of analytical psychology.

Individuation is a major contribution to developmental psychology and encompasses the entire lifetime, no matter its duration. The unique feature of this notion of human development is that it includes spiritual as well as psychosocial features. The essays in this volume explain and expand on Jung’s fundamental contributions.
Murray Stein shares these timeless lectures—a work of respectful and loving interpretation. The Bible presents a world elaborated with reference to a specific God image. As the mythographer Karl Kerenyi puts it in writing about the Greek gods and goddesses, every god and every goddess constitutes a world. So it is too with the biblical God, whose name Stein exceptionally capitalizes throughout out of cultural respect. The biblical world is the visionary product of a particular people, the ancient Hebrews and the early Christians, who delved deeply into their God image and pulled from it the multitude of perspectives, rules for life, spiritual practices, and practical implications that all together created the tapestry that we find depicted in the canonical Bible. Yahweh is the heart and soul of this world, its creator, sustainer, and destroyer. The Bible is a dream that tells the story of how this world was brought into being in space and time and what it means.
 
With the necessary demise and death of antique cosmologies and traditional religious paradigms dependent on external deities and devils, the modern religious challenge involves two simultaneous sacred endeavors: to eulogize, bury, and grieve the theistic and monotheistic god-images and the religions dependent on them; and, secondly, to bring fresh imagination to the meanings of god and religion, which will satisfy both the modern mind and ancient soul.
 
Drawing on the insights of Jungian or analytical psychology, Dr. Wright offers depth psychological analysis of our contemporary religious and political dilemmas, as well as invites readers to be midwives for the emerging religious myth that many believe to be on our collective horizon — a myth that will be more inclusive, intellectually and scientifically honest, and soul satisfying.
 
Breast cancer can interrupt a life and demand that we pay more attention to the way we live. In this lyrical and inviting account, Patricia Greer explores associations and images that surround her experience of the disease. A Jungian analyst, she works with metaphors and meanings related to the illness and uses her dreams, inner journeys, and poetry to deepen into and under the reality of cancer. She shares her exploration with the hope that it may help others reflect on their experiences and find insights from understanding cancer as a source of wisdom. For all those who have been touched by the disease and for those who love them, care about them, care for them, breast cancer can be a soul journey.
 

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Just Released! Volume 2 of The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz

 
 Volume 2 of the Collected Works of
Marie-Louise von Franz turns to the Hero’s Journey within fairytales.  The hardcover edition is now available for purchase.

The Hero’s Journey is about the great adventure that leads to a cherished and difficult to obtain prize. In these fairytales, the Self is often symbolized as that treasured prize and the hero’s travails symbolize the process of individuation. In its many manifestations, the hero embodies the emerging personality. “In the conscious world, the hero is only one part of the personality—the despised part—and through his attachment to the Self in the unconscious is a symbol of the whole personality.”

Von Franz’s prodigious knowledge of fairytales from around the world demonstrates that the fairytale draws its root moisture from the collective realm. This volume continues where Volume 1 left off as von Franz describes the fairytale, “suspended between the divine and the secular worlds (…) creating a mysterious and pregnant tension that requires extreme power to withstand.” The resistance of the great mother against the hero and his humble origins, as well as the hero freeing the anima figure from the clutches of the unconscious are universal archetypal patterns. The spoils retrieved by the hero symbolize new levels of consciousness wrested from the unconscious.
 
Table of Contents  
 
  • Introduction
 
  • Chapter 1. The Three Feathers
 
  • Chapter 2. The Poor Miller’s Boy and the Cat
 
  • Chapter 3. Tritill, Litill, and the Birds
 
  • Chapter 4. The Devil with the Three Golden Hairs
 
  • Chapter 5. The King of the Golden Mountain
 
  • Chapter 6. Stupid Ivanko 
 
  • Chapter 7. The Virgin Tsar 
 
  • Chapter 8. The Blind Padishah 
 
  • Chapter 9. The Boy and the Snake 
 
  • Chapter 10. The Rose Maiden 
 
  • Chapter 11. The Golden Bird 
 
  • Chapter 12. The Golden Castle that Hung in the Air 
 
  • Chapter 13. The Red Swan 
 
  • Chapter 14. The Story of Djihanishah 
 
  • Chapter 15. Djulek Batür 
 
  • Chapter 16. The Magician Palermo 
 
  • Chapter 17. Endings – the Meaning of the End of a Fairytale 
 
  • Bibliography 
 
  • Index of Authors 
 
  • Index of Fairytales 
 
  • Subject Index
 
Volume 1 – 
The Profane and Magical Worlds
 
Volume 1 – Both paperback and hardcover – are now available.  Fairytales, like myths, provide a cultural and societal backdrop that helps the human imagination narrate the meaning of life’s events. The remarkable similarities in fairytale motifs across different lands and cultures inspired many scholars to search for the original homeland of fairytales. While peregrinations of fairytale motifs occur, the common root of fairytales is more archetypal than geographic. A striking feature of fairytales is that a sense of space, time, and causality is absent. This situates them in a magical realm, a land of the soul, where the most interesting things happen in the center of places like Heaven, mountains, lakes, and wells.
Register for upcoming presentation
The Jung Center of Houston Presents “Marie Louise von Franz and the Profane and Magical Worlds (Livestreaming) with Dr. Steven Buser
 
 
Friday, Jul 30, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Total Clock Hours: 2.00
Total CE Hours: 2.00
Non-member Pricing: $75.00

Dr. Steven Buser is one of two General Editor’s for The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz. Join The Jung Center of Houston as Dr. Buser takes us through a history of the project, an overview of von Franz’s life and work, as well as a deep dive into the first volume of this foundational material.

This livestreaming program can be taken from home or anywhere with an internet connection. If you register, you will be emailed viewing instructions either the evening before or the morning of the event. Please be sure to check “spam” and “junk” folders!

All times are CDT. Please contact onlinelearning@junghouston.org with any questions. Learn more about online learning.

Please register early.
 
Chiron Publications, PO Box 19690, 28815, Asheville, United States

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Dream and Spirituality Conference

☀️ Chiron authors featured at Summer Dream & Spirituality Conference ☀️

 
 
☀️ Chiron authors featured at Summer Dream & Spirituality Conference ☀
The Haden Institute Summer Dream & Spirituality Conference, set for May 30 – June 3, will be online this year.  Spaces are still available – register today.  Several Chiron authors will be featured.  The event includes nine keynotes, 34 workshops, dream groups, creative space, worship and meditations and featured music.
 
Linda McFadden, author of In Brigid’s Footsteps
Linda McFadden, author of In Brigid’s Footsteps, will be a keynote speaker with the topic of The Return of the Goddess and the Age of Aquarius.  The rising of the feminine aspect of the divine corresponds with earth’s transition to a new astrological age and a new phase in human consciousness. Yet while the new aeon offers great hope for the emergence of different ways of doing and being, the disintegration of old certainties makes the threshold through which we are passing a time of confusion and fear. Brigid has reemerged as the divine feminine archetype who can guide us through this liminal time and serve as midwife to the divine Self within each of us.  Linda will also lead three workshops with the titles of Pilgrimage: Travel for the Soul; Brigid as Archetype of the Divine; and Unbalancing of Western Civilization.


Anne Elizabeth Taylor, author of Unveiling Sophia
Anne Elizabeth Taylor, author of Unveiling Sophia, will lead a workshop with the title of Jung, Kundalini and the Feminine Voice of Individuation.
Chelsea Wakefield, author of The Labyrinth of Love, will lead a workshop with the title of The Labyrinth of Love: Beyond Projection into Individuation into Connection.
 
Bob Hoss, co-editor of Dreams That Change Our Lives: A Publication of The International Association for the Study of Dreams, will lead workshops with the titles of Give Your Dreams a Voice!; and Recognizing Dream Guidance. 
 
 

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Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz – Available May 17 – Volume 1 in Paperback

Available May 17 – Volume 1 in Paperback – preorder now 
The Collected Works of 
Marie-Louise von Franz 
Volume 1 
Paperback Version of Volume 1 available May 17
 
 
This newly translated volume of the Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz, one of the most renowned authorities on fairytales, presents a systematic and wide-ranging approach. Von Franz amplifies a variety of fairytale motifs to show that the magical realm is alien to the profane and mundane realm of ordinary daily life. She was one of Analytical Psychology’s most original thinkers and here she presents a lucid, concise exploration of the archetypal symbols found in fairytales.
 
 
 Hardcover Version of Volume 2 available June 1
 
Volume 2 turns to the Hero’s Journey within fairytales.  The hardcover edition is now available for pre-orders and will release on June 1.

The Hero’s Journey is about the great adventure that leads to a cherished and difficult to obtain prize. In these fairytales, the Self is often symbolized as that treasured prize and the hero’s travails symbolize the process of individuation. In its many manifestations, the hero embodies the emerging personality. “In the conscious world, the hero is only one part of the personality—the despised part—and through his attachment to the Self in the unconscious is a symbol of the whole personality.”

Von Franz’s prodigious knowledge of fairytales from around the world demonstrates that the fairytale draws its root moisture from the collective realm. This volume continues where Volume 1 left off as von Franz describes the fairytale, “suspended between the divine and the secular worlds (…) creating a mysterious and pregnant tension that requires extreme power to withstand.” The resistance of the great mother against the hero and his humble origins, as well as the hero freeing the anima figure from the clutches of the unconscious are universal archetypal patterns. The spoils retrieved by the hero symbolize new levels of consciousness wrested from the unconscious.
Watch presentations by 
Dr. Steven Buser on the
Collected Works of 
Marie-Louise von Franz

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Edge of the Abyss – An interview with Robert Skidmore

More about Robert:

Robert Isaac Skidmore, Ph.D., M.Div., is a licensed counselor in Oregon. He studied theology at St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary, and depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. He teaches as an adjunct professor in the clinical and mental health counseling program at Southern Oregon University. His 2017 dissertation applied Jung’s theory of the shadow to Christianity and Western culture, looking at the Sumerian myth of the descent of Inanna as an instance of material that has been historically and archetypally repressed. He has authored a number of articles on theological and psychological themes, including On Mental Health Referrals by Orthodox Clergy, in 2019. From 2000 to 2012, he was the rector at Archangel Gabriel Orthodox Church, in Ashland, Oregon, where he now serves as auxiliary priest.

More about the book:

Academic discourse does not often reference the idea of antichrist, perhaps because it is seen as archaic or as too closely associated with religious fundamentalism. Robert Isaac Skidmore, a depth psychotherapist and an Orthodox priest, argues that antichrist, alongside its theological meaning, designates an aspect of our psychological, social, and political experience that becomes hazardous, especially when ignored or dismissed. Seeing Donald Trump’s cultural and political influence as expressive of an archetypal pattern, Skidmore explores implications of taking the idea of antichrist seriously—in order to lift it toward conscious awareness and responsible use. Christian individuals are asked to reconsider the theological function of the notion of antichrist as a summons to self-scrutiny concerning their fidelity to truth. Readers, religious or not, are invited to awareness of antichrist’s archetypal contours, in order to appreciate its significance for the understanding of psychological and social phenomena and to better understand the implications of its use—including its potential benefits and hazards.

“Dr. Skidmore has revived the importance of an ancient Christian idea, showing its relevance for our contemporary situation. His correlation of the Antichrist with the antisocial personality is particularly important in this context, presenting a challenge to Christians of all denominations.”

Lionel Corbett, Jungian analyst, Professor of depth psychology, Pacifica Graduate Institute

“In this suggestive piece, psychologist and theologian, Robert Skidmore, brings together concepts from Christian scripture and modern depth psychology to elucidate one another and, together, to cast light on a contemporary American political phenomenon. Specifically, he shows how the Biblical notion of ‘antichrist’ can both enhance and be enhanced by the psychological constructs of sociopathy, Freudian conceptions of repression and projection and Jungian ideas of shadow and archetype, and how these may help explain President Trump’s popularity among believers. Identifying deception as the hallmark of ‘fake Christ,’ Skidmore helps to bring to awareness the human temptation to revert to tribal instincts in stressful times. He cautions those who seek to follow Jesus to ‘put not your trust in princes nor the sons of men, in whom there is no salvation’ (Psalm 146:3).”

Mark Nickolas, Eastern Orthodox Christian and Psychologist

“I knew Rob Skidmore when he was a seminary student; Fr Isaac, to give him his ecclesiastical name; Prof. Skidmore, as I am proud to call him now. He has written a deceptively simple book, whose brevity and unassuming title belie its spiritual depth. Throughout, we are cautioned about the perils of self-deception and reminded of the need for self-awareness if we are to find healing and wholeness.  This is a profound book, but also very timely. In our era of Donald Trump, the concept of antichrist as we meet it in the Bible reminds us how easy it is to mistake error for truth, especially when error retains the appearance of truth. As Prof. Skidmore points out, psychology serves a similar function when it alerts us to the deceptive charms of the sociopath, who may show a high level of cognitive empathy but be altogether lacking in emotional or compassionate empathy – the con man who is very good at ‘reading’ other people but lacks any inclination to take meaningful, helpful action.  This book is timely for another reason – one that Prof. Skidmore could not have realized when he was writing. The era of Donald Trump has now fused with the era of Covid-19. In recent years we have grown accustomed to the unprecedented. We cease to be shocked when conventional norms for behavior are discarded one after another. But in the era of Covid-19, our anxiety has been raised to a new level. We grasp for anything – even cartloads of toilet paper – that will give us a sense of being in control. Whatever we once thought of as ‘normal’ is exposed as illusion. This may be a good thing. This may alert us to our need for the spiritual sobriety and vigilance that Prof. Skidmore expounds so ably.”

Rev. John H. Erickson, Peter N. Gramowich Professor Emeritus and Former Dean, St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary

“Until reading the Rev. Dr. Skidmore’s work, I had yet to find a fully layered, accurate, satisfying albeit sobering diagnosis of the mind-scrambling national madness in which we have all been embroiled in the past 5+ years. With wisdom drawn from depth psychology, political philosophy, and Christian theology, Skidmore adeptly wrests the construct of ‘antichrist’ from pop culture and applies it fruitfully to our present moment. In my estimation, the ‘usefulness of the terminology of Antichrist’ will be so if and only if we dare to do two things: 1. to take in its full meaning as Skidmore describes it. And 2. to then use it to do the hard of work of self-analysis, confession and transformation as Skidmore encourages. Only then, in Christ’s merciful true light, will we stand a chance to be freed from our collective intoxicating madness and be returned to our grounded loving right minds. But is that what we want?”
Deborah B. Edgar, PhD, LMFT, Private Practice, Pasadena, CA, www.theunselfishjourney.com

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Interview with Susan M.  Tiberghien – Writing Toward Wholeness

Interview with Susan M.  Tiberghien – Writing Toward Wholeness – Écrire vers la plénitude   

 This interview was originally written in French and published on Espace Francophone Jungien (EFJ)
 

To keep your own red book, to write to your soul, this is the main thread of Writing Toward Wholeness by Susan Tiberghien. Jungian author, well known in the Anglo-Saxon world, this is her first book in French, translated by Christian Raguet.  

 

We have wished to ask her a few questions to which she accepted to reply.  

 

You write that Writing Toward Wholeness is the fruit of over thirty years of Jungian readings and reflections.

Susan Tiberghien, When I turned 50, I returned to my desire to write, to be a writer. I had married a Frenchman and together raised our six children in different countries in Europe. In order to pursue my dream, I attended a two-week writing workshop in the United States which helped me retrieve my mother tongue. 

I started publishing short stories and directing workshops for writers. I was reading a great deal, our great writers and spiritual masters. I was intrigued by C.G. Jung who, while being a scientist, spoke of the soul. His autobiography, Memories Dreams, Reflections, encouraged me to take courses at the C.G. Jung Institute in Küsnacht near Zurich, and to enter into analysis. 

These years of reflection, this interior voyage, led me to find myself—wife, mother, writer, teacher, and searcher. Today I continue to follow this path toward wholeness through writing, reading and prayer. This is the path of thirty years of which I speak in Writing Toward Wholeness.

 

                                                                         Chiron Publications

 

Murray Stein, who prefaced your book, wrote “Any person can benefit from keeping a journal of experiences, dreams, associations, and feelings.”  

Stein in his excellent Foreword continues, “This project is for self-knowledge… We write in a journal to become and to know who we are.”  Therefore, the real work in journal writing, is a work on oneself.

 

Marion Woodman writes in her book Bone, Dying into Life, that journal writing is a way for her to discuss with herself. “I hear my truth resonating in my own daily experience.”

 

Today, I continue to converse with myself in my journals. Once we open the door to the unconscious through writing, as through dreaming, the depths only continue to deepen.

 

There are many testimonies where Jung is counselling his analysands to write everything down. You speak of his counsel to Christiana Morgan noted in her analysis journal in 1926.

Jung’s counsel to Christiana Morgan is addressed to each of us today.  

“I should advise you to put it all down as beautifully as you can, in some beautifully bound book…it will be your church—your cathedral—the silent places of your spirit where you will find renewal…for in that book is your soul.”

Jung counsels us to write down our dreams, our reflections, our desires. Our journals become our chapels, there where in silence, we speak with our soul.

My journal is not a large beautifully bound book. It fits into my purse so that it is always close at hand. When I read anew the pages, I find the footprints of my soul. I do not write each day. Rather I write when I wish to understand something, when I wish to deepen a thought, when my soul calls to me.

Then the journal becomes a door to the unconscious. I enter the imaginal world and listen to who is calling me. I benefit from Jung’s examples, his years of confrontation with the unconscious, his search for his soul. I read and studied deeply the Red Book. The way Jung addresses each image, which he will later call active imagination, has become my way of connecting the conscious and the unconscious. 

 

In the Larousse dictionary, wholeness is the condition of the person who has reached his highest degree of development, who is at the summit of his force, his intensity, his entirety.  Is there a connection between wholeness and the notion of totality for Jung?  

I see well the connection between wholeness and the notion of totality. Jung himself speaks of it when he relates his last dream to Ruth Bailey. “He saw a big round block of stone in a high bare place and on it was inscribed, ‘This shall be a sign unto you of wholeness and oneness.’”

 

However, I discern in the word wholeness a spiritual meaning that I do not discern in the word totality.   

In my book, I define wholeness as the unity of all creation. In the word unity, there is a feeling of harmony that I do not find in the word totality. 

 

It is this feeling of harmony that Jung experienced in his last years. He writes in

Memories, Dreams, Reflections, “There is so much that fills me: plants, animals, clouds, day and night, and the eternal in man. The more uncertain I have felt about myself, the more there has grown up in me a feeling of kinship with all things.”  

 

A feeling of kinship with all things, with plants, animals, clouds, with the eternal in humankind. It is this sense of kinship, of harmony, of communion that I am searching for in Writing Toward Wholeness.

 

Your book is filled with numerous examples. What are the main rules of keeping a journal ?  

I would say there are no rules. There are a thousand ways to keep a journal. It is the practice that counts: to sit down and write freely. 

I suggest a time limit to avoid writing pages and pages. Since I see journaling as a way to deepen one’s life, one’s sense of self, one’s relationship with one’s soul, I propose a slow writing, a meditative writing. Often half a page suffices to touch your soul.

I will give however one rule: note the day, the time, and the place. This way you will be able more easily to find where you were, to find anew “the silent places of your spirit where you will find renewal.”  

 

You evoke the role of writing in the lives of Thomas Merton, Etty Hillesum, and many other authors…

I would like to speak here of the fundamental importance of writing for Thomas Merton, Etty Hillesum and C.G. Jung.  

Thomas Merton was a writer before he was a monk. He defined himself in and through his writing:  the young boy who lost his parents, the undisciplined student, the dissipated vagabond, the poet, the monk, the mystic. It is in writing that he was able to discover his own self: seeker of God. From his entrance into the Cistercian monastery, he kept a journal. It is here that he reveals himself, on the pages of the numerous volumes of his journals.  

Etty Hillesum by contrast kept a journal for only three years from when she was 26 in 1941 until her death at Auschwitz in 1934. She started to journal to uncover the force to continue to live the nightmare that was enveloping her as a Jew in Amsterdam at the height of the Nazi genocide. 

In looking for that force within herself, she found God. Day after day, she kept the chronicle of the discovery of her soul. Three months before her death, she was able to write in her journal, An Interrupted Life, “The beat of my heart has grown deeper, more active, and yet more peaceful, and it is as if I were all the time storing up inner riches.”  

 

I turn now to C.G. Jung who insists on the importance of writing down our dreams, our active imaginations, our conversations with our soul. In Mysterium Coniunctionis, Jung gives a description of active imagination, concluding with this advice, “Fix the whole procedure in writing at the time of occurrence for you… [for] that will counteract tendency to self-deception.”

 

It is all too easy to not believe what our soul is whispering to us. 

This is well what Jung did when he returned to his black books in 1913, after having left them aside for several years, to write down his confrontation with the unconscious and to then transcribe it into the Red Book with artistic calligraphy.  

For sixteen years, Jung continued to write commentaries about each vision, as he continued to dialogue with his soul. As Murray Stein writes in the Foreword, “He undertook a risky venture and survived. For us, the risks are not so great because we have his story of the journey as a support.” 

To keep a journal is to keep a record of a voyage, a voyage of the soul toward God.  

 

To conclude, give us three key elements in successfully keeping a journal to accompany us as we journey toward wholeness.

A first element: our journals are our own red books. In order that they accompany us toward wholeness, it is necessary to fully engage in the writing. To want to write. Each of us seeks to better understand ourselves. Keeping a journal is one way. Jung counsels us to do so. 

A second element would be to sit down and write. Too easily we have the tendency to wait for the next day. So that this work becomes a practice like prayer, try to devote a half an hour, even a quarter of an hour, each day to journaling. Or if you prefer an hour every two days. Find your own rhythm and stay with it. 

The third element: to be sincere in what you write. There is no room in journaling for artifice. We cannot dissimulate, make believe, appear otherwise. When we write in a journal, we are alone with ourselves in front of the empty page.  

When our journals are sincere, they become our chapels. They become the home of our soul.

 

We thank Susan Tiberghien to have taken the time to present her work. We recommend Writing Toward Wholeness to all who wish to embark upon this adventure.  

March 2021

Espace Francophone Jungien (EFJ), which translates roughly to “Jungian Francophone Environment,” is a content publishing platform dedicated to Jungian psychology and written entirely in French. In addition to featuring articles, book presentations, and interviews, it offers interactive seminars (workshops) based on the ideas of C.G. Jung and his successors. 

 
The website www.cgjung.net was founded in March 1998 by J.P. Robert. Since then, numerous people have joined the EFJ platform, where they actively contribute to deepening Jungian thought and to exploring his ideas and taking them in new directions. In 2011 the EFJ website was chosen to officially present the French edition of Jung’s Red Book.
 
 

  

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March Newsletter

March Highlights from 
Chiron Publications
Attend Virtual Book Launch of Simply Being 
 
You are invited to attend the virtual book launch of Simply Being.  Published earlier this year by Chiron Publications, Simply Being is a celebration of the various facets of life, its blessings, beauties, and challenges. Exploring the richness of our manifold existence seen through the many different lenses beyond the quotidian and the mundane, Roula-Maria Dib looks at the multifariousness of reality and nuances of the self with its different roles and experiences, peeking into the parallel worlds of myth, and art, which infuse our everyday life.
 
Roula-Maria Dibb will be launching the book on March 17 at the AUD Indelible Festival of Literature, which she is organizing at the American University in Dubai. To register, click here.
Chiron Authors on Speaking of Jung Podcast

Listen to the following Chiron authors who have recently joined Laura London on her podcast Speaking of Jung:
 

March Book of the Month
 
The Dreams of
John Adams and Benjamin Rush

Paperback Original Price $12.99
On Sale for $6.49


The letters of John Adams and Benjamin Rush depict the friendship that grew between the two as the course of history brought change into their lives and forced them to change themselves.

Of particular interest are the dreams both Founding Fathers described in their letters and the evidence Sheila Zarrow has uncovered about how they considered the effects of their dreams.

Friendship and Healing explores one bright thread in the history of our country through the letters and dreams of two men who were there at its beginning.
 
Psychreative
A monthly get-together for Jungian creatives 
from both clinical and non-clinical backgrounds
 
This monthly event allows Jungian artists, poets, and musicians to share their work (within 5–10-minute time slots) in a laid-back setting. The purpose is to build an international community of Jungian creatives and to find a fun, informal way for cultivating a shared artistic space under the umbrella of “active imagination.” 
 
Unlike formal lectures, Psychreative is a casual social gathering that allows Jungian artists and art fans from around the world to connect with one another through shared creativity.
 
The first event will be this Saturday, March 13, at 6 pm (London time), lasting around 90 minutes.
 
Professor Susan Rowland will be giving an opening talk on Jung and creativity, followed by a reading of some of her creative writing. Other creatives presenting are: Andrea Tossatto, Greg Mahr, Elizabeth Nelson, Inez Martinez, Hedy Habra, Gelareh Khoie, Bianca Reynolds, Claude Barbre, and Chiron author Roula-Maria Dib..
 
If you are interested in attending, you may register on the following link
Chiron Publications, PO Box 19690, 28815, Asheville, United States

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Marie-Louise von Franz

At the age of eighteen, Marie-Louise von Franz was invited to meet Carl Gustav Jung at Bolingen Tower. She immediately recognized that there exist two levels of reality, one outer and the other inner. 

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Preview Volume 2 of The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz

THE COLLECTED WORKS OF 
MARIE-LOUISE VON FRANZ 
 
A look at Volumes 1 & 2
The Jung Society of Washington
Steven Buser, Editor
Join the Jung Society of Washington for a virtual program as Steven Buser, M.D., publisher of Chiron Publications, and one of two General Editors of The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz, takes us through a history of the project, an overview of von Franz’s life and work, as well as a deep dive into the first two volumes of this foundational material. A panel presentation with three experts will follow, including Melanie Starr Costello, Gary Sparks, and Monika Wikman. The remaining time will be reserved for questions and answers. 
 
When:  Sunday, February 28, 2021
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Location:  Zoom, Eastern Time
 
Von Franz, one of the most renowned authorities on fairytales, presents a systematic and wide-ranging approach. She amplifies a variety of fairytale motifs to show that the magical realm is alien to the profane and mundane realm of ordinary daily life. She was one of Analytical Psychology’s most original thinkers and here she presents a lucid, concise exploration of the archetypal symbols found in fairytales. 
 
Fairytales, like myths, provide a cultural and societal backdrop that helps the human imagination narrate the meaning of life’s events. The remarkable similarities in fairytale motifs across different lands and cultures inspired many scholars to search for the original homeland of fairytales. While peregrinations of fairytale motifs occur, the common root of fairytales is more archetypal than geographic. A striking feature of fairytales is that a sense of space, time, and causality is absent. This situates them in a magical realm, a land of the soul, where the most interesting things happen in the center of places like Heaven, mountains, lakes, and wells.

Marie-Louise von Franz

At the age of eighteen, Marie-Louise von Franz was invited to meet Carl Gustav Jung at Bolingen Tower. She immediately recognized that there exist two levels of reality, one outer and the other inner. Within months she had enrolled at the University of Zürich and began attending Jung’s lectures at the E.T.H. (Eidgenösiche Technische Hochshule or the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology). Less than a decade after meeting Jung, von Franz had completed her doctorate in classical philology and begun seeing her first analysands. She was a prolific writer, a dedicated teacher and lecturer, and was possessed of a “far-reaching and often non discriminating Eros that accepted everyone seeking help.” (Alfred Ribi, MD in Fountain of the Love of Wisdom, Chiron, 2006)
 

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