Author Archive

March Book Spotlight: The Mythmaker by Mary Harrell

 

The Mythmaker
 
Paperback Original Price $14.95
On Sale for $11.25
A 2018 Silver Nautilus Book Award Winner, The Mythmaker is a personal myth, a fiction, based on author and depth psychologist Dr. Mary Harrell’s life. After the sudden death of her mother, seven young children and an overwhelmed father were left to figure out what to do. Acknowledging that seminal happenings enwombed in our past seek re-membering, and in the tradition of personal mythtelling, Dr. Harrell, began a writer’s journey, to re-collect the meaning of her story. She proceeded in a series of spiralic returns gathering meaningful shards of symbolic experience.
Dr. Harrell, as we all do, found herself asking, “Who or what is here right now, to inform this long ago, and also, present moment?” Such self-reflective activity took her back to memories, not as they were, but as she perceived them to be. With each return, she found a different fiction, an echo, a fabrication, and also the better truth that brought her closer to coherence, that soulful state best described as wholeness. Through this process the past emerged and the full story found its way to the pages of this book. Beyond the death of Dr. Harrell’s mother, an additional reality within The Mythmaker story is irrefutable. An angel, an imaginal figure, began entering the author’s life when she was fifteen years old. The angel’s aim was to be an ally, thereby transforming grief into a story of healing. Her presence reminds us that preposterous aspects of our own myth may inform the deeper truth of our experience.

Also from Author Mary Harrell
Imaginal Figures In Everyday Life

 

 Mary Harrell unflinchingly greets a cast of imaginal figures who inhabit her life, and encourages all of us to welcome their wisdom into our own inner landscapes. These very real beings dwell in a realm between matter (nature) and mind (reason), appearing in dreams, intuitive callings, visions, feelings, and sometimes frightening events.

Mary Harrell, Ph.D.

Mary Harrell, Ph.D., a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist and New York licensed psychologist, received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with Emphasis in Depth Psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute in Carpinteria, California. She is Curriculum and Instruction Associate Professor Emeritus at State University of New York (SUNY) at Oswego. While at the university she taught education and psychology courses and served as Professional Development Schools (PDS) specialist, supporting the National PDS initiative, which builds bridges between elementary and secondary schools and the university’s School of Education. Her writings in the areas of educational reform, and imaginal psychology appear in four invited chapters in edited books. In 2014 Mary’s poetry was anthologized in Syracuse University’s The Stone Canoe, a Journal of Arts, Literature and Social Commentary, No. 8. She lives with her husband, Stephen, in South Carolina.

 
 
 

Coming in March from Chiron
 
Volume 6 of the Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz – Niklaus Von Flüe And Saint Perpetua: A Psychological Interpretation of Their Visions
 
 

The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz is a 28 volume Magnum Opus from one of the leading minds in Jungian Psychology. Volume 6 heralds translations of material never before available in English. It explores the profound visions of two ground-breaking saints in the Catholic church, Saint Niklaus von Flüe and Saint Perpetua.

Note: Volumes 4 and 5 are currently in production and we look forward to the releases when translations are complete.

New releases from Chiron
 
Four Pillars of Jungian Psychoanalysis
 
The Four Pillars of Jungian Psychoanalysis by Murray Stein is a work that describes the methods that in combination sets this form of psychotherapy apart from all the others.
 

The first chapter describes how the theory of individuation serves as an assessment tool for the analyst and guides the process toward the client’s further psychological development. The second chapter, on the analytic relationship, discusses the depth psychological understanding of the healing effect of the therapeutic encounter.

Working with dreams and active imagination comprise the other two chapters. In both of these chapters, there is detailed discussions of how these methods are used in Jungian psychoanalysis and to what purpose. It is the combination of “the four pillars” that makes Jungian psychoanalysis unique.

Professor Hamilton’s Passage to India
 
In 1975, Dr. Charles Hamilton, Professor of Infectious Diseases from a respected medical school in the U.S. visited India after receiving a substantial research grant. There he was invited by several institutes to visit and lecture. He accepted the invitations gladly and hoped to explore the possibility of his return for an extended stay to gather valuable data for his research.
 
 

At Home In The World: 
Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging 
 
Part of the Zurich Lecture Series and previously published by Spring Journal, this work offers a profound philosophical and psychological exploration of the multi-dimensional significance of home and the interwoven themes of homelessness and homesickness and contemporary global culture.
 
 

The Sacred Well Murders
 

Author Susan Rowland’s first mystery novel!

A simple job turns deadly when Mary Wandwalker, novice detective, is hired to chaperone a young American, Rhiannon, to the Oxford University Summer School on the ancient Celts. Worried by a rhetoric of blood sacrifice, Mary and her operatives, Caroline, and Anna, attend a sacrifice at a sacred well. They discover that those who fail to individuate their gods become possessed by them.

The Broken Mirror: Refracted Visions of Ourselves
 
The Broken Mirror: Refracted Visions of Ourselves by James Hollis explores the need to know ourselves more deeply, and the many obstacles that stand in our way. The various chapters illustrate internal obstacles such as intimidation by the magnitude of the project, the readiness to avoid the hard work, and gnawing self-doubt, but also provide tools to strengthen consciousness to take these obstacles on. Additional essays address living in haunted houses, the necessity of failure, and the gift and limits of therapy.
 

C.G. Jung as Artisan: Cross Connections with India, Considerations in Times of Crisis
 
C.G. Jung as Artisan: Cross Connections with India, Considerations in Times of Crisis is a richly illustrated, carefully interwoven tapestry of cosmological cycles with depths of travelling, trade, and commercial significance through geographical history and politics, and the spread of philosophical, religious, and scientific ideas, personally engaged. 
 
The author’s life-long engagement with aspects of India started with her birth there in pre-Independence days. Jung’s short but extensive 1937–38 journey to India was on behalf of the Silver Jubilee of the Indian Science Congress Association in conjunction with the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

Haunted – the Death Mother Archetype
The disturbing experience of psychological infanticide reflects the darkest aspect of the wounding of the Sacred Feminine – the Death Mother archetype that annihilates rather than nurtures life. Through myth, story, classic literature, biography, poems, art and dreams, Dr. Violet Sherwood weaves together symbolic aspects of psychological infanticide with psychoanalytic theory of traumatic attachment and the literal truth of a centuries-old history of infanticide. 

The God-Image: From Antiquity to Jung

 

This book describes the development of images of God, beginning in antiquity and culminating in Jung’s notion of the Self, an image of God in the psyche that Jung calls the God within. Over the course of history, the Self has been projected onto many local gods and goddesses and given different names and attributes. These deities are typically imagined as existing in a heavenly realm, but Jung’s approach recalls them to their origins in the objective psyche.

There You Are – Marion Woodman: 
Biography of a Friendship

How deep can a friendship go?

Jill Mellick explores the grace, challenges, and gifts of an unexpected, instantly deep friendship with Marion Woodman. She documents with letters, calls, journals, memories, and photographs.

Timeless moments—singing, dancing, opening arms to storms, holding public events or retreats by the Pacific and on an island in Georgian Bay, home stays, creating words and music together—unfold. Across decades, they exchange letters about external and internal journeys. Their friendship and love endure, together, apart, through harrowing, life-threatening illnesses each; Mellick even secures Woodman a second opinion, which saves her life.

Whispers of the Soul: New and Selected Poems
 

WHISPERS OF THE SOUL
…SOMETIMES GENTLE
…SOMETIMES FIERCE

A collection of poems that range from expressions of gratitude for the gifts of nature, to musings about aging and the fragility of life, to insights about women’s issues and concerns, to observations about the complexities of family dynamics, to reflections about writing and therapy.

Manisha Roy’s “Professor Hamilton’s  Passage to India” Now Available!

Manisha Roy’s  
Professor Hamilton’s 
Passage to India
Now Available from Chiron

 

Chiron Publications is pleased to announce Manisha Roy’s Professor Hamilton’s Passage to India is available for purchase.
 
In Professor Hamilton’s Passage to India…
 

Manisha Roy presents a fresh and unique variation to the observations of E.M. Forster in his Passage to India and so many authors since, by introducing an American doctor into the setting of the Indian society of 1970s.

In 1975 Dr. Charles Hamilton, Professor of medicine from a reputed American University travels to India with the purpose of gathering data on tropical parasitic diseases and with the hope that his discoveries would benefit the large number of infected poor of that country. However, his experiences and encounters with urban and rural Indians range from hilarious to touching pathos. The unexpected impediments and emotional conflicts in his quest turn into a crucible leading a transformation that is subtle but life-changing. Professor Hamilton fails to complete his research but gains a new attitude.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1 – Raghavan
Chapter 2 – The Telegram
Chapter 3 – Emily
Chapter 4 – Emily and Raghavan
Chapter 5 – Dr. Ramamurthi & Dr. Devi
Chapter 6 – Emily’s Diary
Chapter 7 – Calcutta
Chapter 8 – The Reception
Chapter 9 – Leena Sanyal
Chapter 10 – Inscrutable Leena
Chapter 11 – Goodbye to Balipuram
Chapter 12 – The Village
Chapter 13 – Panu
Chapter 14 – Sanat & Sumita
Chapter 15 – The Villagers
Chapter 16 – Bina
Chapter 17 – The Crisis
Chapter 18 – Margaret
Chapter 19 – The Marriage
Chapter 20 – Confession
Chapter 21 – Leaving Bishpara
Chapter 22 – Return
Chapter 23 – John
Chapter 24 – Confrontation
Chapter 25 – India Again
Biography 
Also from Manisha Roy…

 
Women, Stereotypes And Archetypes
 

The book Women, Stereotypes and Archetypes by Manisha Roy, explores the complexity of modern woman’s identity which is no longer supported by convenient but limiting stereotypes. The book tries to answer following questions :

How do the women handle the confusion arising from such a loss?

If stereotypes are rejected can understanding of the meaning and function of the archetypes in human psyche offer the majority of women guidelines to a secure identity?

Is an American woman’s problem of identity different from that of a woman of another culture?

And finally, where does all this change and crisis lead? Examples from the author’s analytical practice of 40 years and life-long anthropological research and teaching are used to support her observations and conclusions.

My Four Homes: A Memoir
 
Manisha Roy recounts stories from her life, gathered around each of her four “homes.” The first two reflect her early life, visiting her grandparents in villages in what was then the eastern part of Bengal. She recalls the traditions, rituals, and mores of a well-to-do Indian family as she experienced them during her formative years. Her intelligence and curiosity set her on a path to academia, and she broke away, at great personal cost, thwarting the expectations of her family and culture and setting out to work, to love, and to see the world. In this memoir of a Bengali woman, she eventually finds her own inner home and herself in Carl Jung’s psychology and in the process of becoming a Jungian analyst.

About the Author
 
Manisha Roy, PhD, is a geographer, anthropologist and Jungian psychoanalyst in private practice in Cambridge, USA and has been on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston for thirty-seven years. She has taught at the universities in India, the United States and Switzerland and lectured all over the world.
She is the author of eight books, 40 articles which include short stories and poems. She also co-edited three books. She writes in two languages – English and Bengali. Her first book, a non-fiction titled Bengali Women (Chicago Univ. Press, 1975, 1992) has gone through two prints and two editions. This book is now used by many women’s studies departments of several universities all over the world.

At Home in the World : Now available!

At Home in the World: 
Sounds and Symmetries 
of Belonging
Now Available

Chiron Publications is pleased to announce the release of At Home In The World: Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging.  Part of the Zurich Lecture Series and previously published by Spring Journal, this work offers a profound philosophical and psychological exploration of the multi-dimensional significance of home and the interwoven themes of homelessness and homesickness and contemporary global culture.
 
Home is a particular dwelling place, as a cultural or national identity, as a safe temenos in therapy, and as a metaphor for the individuation process are analyzed expertly from multidisciplinary perspectives and, more poignantly, through the sharing of diverse narratives that bear witness to lives lived and endured from memories of homes lost and regained.
 
“With much pleasure and enthusiasm I warmly recommend this extraordinary book to the receptive reader. Written in a colorful, poetic style, John Hill sensitively explores the multi-faceted meanings and experiences at home which is characterized as a womb of many stories and rightly compares to a many-storied house. His elaborations on this theme are psychologically nuanced, extensive, rich in perceptive based upon his lifelong involvement and interest in this topic and lectures he has given about it for over 20 years. Not exclusively focusing on the collective and popular idealization of home, he acknowledges and explores the dark shadows that home also evokes for many of us. A rich feast for the imagination awaits the reader interested in home and all of its many associations.”
Mario Jacoby, Ph.D., ISAPZürich training analyst and author of Individuation and Narcissism and The Analytic Encounter 
 
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
PART I – HOME: WOMB OF MANY STORIES
1. Introduction
2. My Own Home
PART II – HOME: BIRTHPLACE OF CULTURE
3. Preserving a Cultural Context
4. Transient Spaces: Between the Languages of Containment and Reflection
PART III – HOME: TEMENOS OF THE SOUL’S LINEAGE
5. Developmental Perspectives
6. Homecoming: A Metaphor in Therapy
7. Homes of Fate, Homes of Destiny: Individuation and the Transcendent Function
PART IV – HOME: AN ODYSSEY THROUGH MANY LANDS
8. Lost Homes, Lost Nations
9. Ireland: Contemplating a Nation from a Place of Exile
PART V – HOME: RESPONSIBILITY IN UNSETTLED TIMES
10. At Home in a Global Society?
11. Traversing Cultural Boundaries
12. A Many-Storied House
Permissions
Notes
Index
About the Author

John Hill, M.A., is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of Zürich, where he served for many years as a training analyst and lecturer. In private practice in Zürich and a training analyst of ISAPZURICH, he received degrees in philosophy at the University of Dublin and Catholic University, Washington, D.C.

He has lectured internationally on the theme of home for more than twenty years and is also a leading Jungian expert in the field of Celtic mythology.
Also available with 
Zürich Lecture Series Cover
 
At Home In The World: 
Sounds and Symmetries of Belonging 
is Volume 6 of the 
Zürich Lecture Series.
 
 
 
 
Other Zürich Lecture Series Volumes
 
Volume 5 – A Story of Dreams, Fate and Destiny
 
Erel Shalit “calls attention to the dream and its images along the nocturnal axis that leads us from fate to destiny.” He takes us on a journey from ancient history, beginning with the first documented dream, that of Gilgamesh, to Adam and Eve and the serpent, to Joseph in Egypt as the Pharaoh’s dream interpreter, through ancient Greece to the Asklepion, to Swedenborg’s visions, to our world today through the eyes of Freud, Jung, and science, and finally to the process of active imagination to reveal the workings of Mercurius and the transcendent function.

Volume 4 – Creativity: 
Patterns of Creative Imagination as Seen Through Art
 
We don’t know where creativity comes from. Is it inspired from above? Welling up from below? Picked up from the air?
 
This book by Paul Brutsche does not claim to reveal this secret. It does not attempt to reduce creativity to a “nothing but,” for example to explain it as a special ability of certain creative individuals with special abilities. On the contrary, it is about exploring the fullness and variety of this amazing power, which is the basis of all cultural, artistic, scientific and spiritual activity of man, without attributing it to a simple cause.
Volume 3 – Reading Goethe at Midlife: 
Ancient Wisdom, German Classicism & Jung
 
This book by Paul Bishop reveals the remarkable symmetry between the ideas and Jung and Goethe. Jung’s analysis of the stages of life, and his advice to heed the “call of the self,” are brought into the conjunction with Goethe’s emphasis on the importance of hope, showing an underlying continuity of thought and relevance from ancient wisdom, via German classicism to analytical psychology.
Volume 2 – ‘Two Souls Alas’: 
Jung’s Two Personalities and the Making Of 
Analytical Psychology
 
Co-Winner of the International Association for Jungian Studies
Second Annual IAJS Book Awards Program

In his memoir, Memories Dreams Reflections, Carl Jung tells us that, as a child, he had the experience of possessing two personalities. ‘Two Souls Alas,’ by Mark Saban, is the first book to suggest that Jung’s experience of the difficult dynamic between these two personalities not only informs basic principles behind the development of Jung’s psychological model but underscores the theory and practice of Analytical Psychology as a whole.
Volume 1 – Where Soul Meets Matter: 
Clinical and Social Applications of 
Jungian Sandplay Therapy
 
Eva Pattis Zoja explores the psyche’s astonishing capacity and determination to regulate itself by creating images and narratives as soon as a free and protected space for expression is provided. A variety of examples from analytic practice with adults and from psychosocial projects with children in vulnerable situations illustrate how sandplay can be used in different therapeutic settings.

Haunted : Interview with the Author

 

The disturbing experience of psychological infanticide reflects the darkest aspect of the wounding of the Sacred Feminine – the Death Mother archetype that annihilates rather than nurtures life.

Through myth, story, classic literature, biography, poems, art and dreams, Dr. Violet Sherwood weaves together symbolic aspects of psychological infanticide with psychoanalytic theory of traumatic attachment and the literal truth of a centuries-old history of infanticide.

She illuminates the Death Mother archetype in the dynamic between the unwilling (or unsupported) mother and the unwelcome child. Her personal and archetypal journey into, through, and beyond the underworld, offers hope and guidance for the restoration of the relationship between the Sacred Feminine and the Divine Child.

She draws on her professional experience as a psychotherapist and her lived experience of psychological infanticide as a result of closed stranger adoption to explore the intimate connection between life and death, revealing the life task of the infanticided psyche is to embrace death and discover the life that lies beyond the realm of the underworld.

˜

Haunted: the Death Mother Archetype is a wonder of a book. Dr. Sherwood’s impeccable scholarship undergirds a transformative dance between the imaginative capacity of soul, and the harsh realities embedded in her subject matter.” –Mary Harrell, PhD

 

 

 

Violet Sherwood is a Jungian-inspired psychotherapist, poet, author. She lives in the beautiful seaside community of Whaingaroa Raglan in New Zealand, where she practises psychotherapy, writes, and walks the wild west coast beaches. She completed her PhD at AUT University, New Zealand. Violet is passionate about holistic approaches in psychotherapy and trauma therapy. She integrates depth psychology with mindfulness, somatic, energy practices and ancient wisdom traditions. She advocates for the transformational power of writing as a healing practice.

 

 

 

 

Excerpts:

Universal childhood experiences

“Throughout my underworld journey, I learned to listen to the mythic truth of infanticide represented throughout history, and in the many tales of children abandoned or killed by parents or archetypal wicked witches. Fears of abandonment, rejection and infanticide are universal childhood experiences that reveal the child’s awareness of its vulnerability and helpless dependency on the mercy of powerful adults. For many unfortunates, these innate fears become lived reality. The greater story of infanticide as a human truth occurring throughout time, place and culture has something essential to teach us about the way we kill off the most vulnerable and creative parts of ourselves and others. Guided by this mythic consciousness, which might equally be named ‘collective unconscious experience’ or ‘intergenerational trauma’, I felt that exploring the psychohistory of infanticide had much to reveal about this dark recess of our collective and individual psyches.”

Desperate mothers

“Historically, when murder or direct abandonment were no longer morally acceptable, desperate mothers found other ways to dispatch their children, getting rid of them psychologically whilst rationalising that they had not abandoned the child but provided it with other care. In the nineteenth century this handover was to baby farmers or foundling hospitals, both of which had notoriously high mortality rates. Yet the double bind remained tightly in place – what other choices could a woman make without support and social acceptance?”

New and in the Spotlight

Coming in March from Chiron
 
Volume 6 of the Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz – Niklaus Von Flüe And Saint Perpetua: A Psychological Interpretation of Their Visions
 
 

The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz is a 28 volume Magnum Opus from one of the leading minds in Jungian Psychology. Volume 6 heralds translations of material never before available in English. It explores the profound visions of two ground-breaking saints in the Catholic church, Saint Niklaus von Flüe and Saint Perpetua.

Note: Volumes 4 and 5 are currently in production and we look forward to the releases when translations are complete.

New releases from Chiron
 
Four Pillars of Jungian Psychoanalysis
 
The Four Pillars of Jungian Psychoanalysis by Murray Stein is a work that describes the methods that in combination sets this form of psychotherapy apart from all the others.
 

The first chapter describes how the theory of individuation serves as an assessment tool for the analyst and guides the process toward the client’s further psychological development. The second chapter, on the analytic relationship, discusses the depth psychological understanding of the healing effect of the therapeutic encounter.

Working with dreams and active imagination comprise the other two chapters. In both of these chapters, there is detailed discussions of how these methods are used in Jungian psychoanalysis and to what purpose. It is the combination of “the four pillars” that makes Jungian psychoanalysis unique.

The Sacred Well Murders
 

Author Susan Rowland’s first mystery novel!

A simple job turns deadly when Mary Wandwalker, novice detective, is hired to chaperone a young American, Rhiannon, to the Oxford University Summer School on the ancient Celts. Worried by a rhetoric of blood sacrifice, Mary and her operatives, Caroline, and Anna, attend a sacrifice at a sacred well. They discover that those who fail to individuate their gods become possessed by them.

The Broken Mirror: Refracted Visions of Ourselves
 
The Broken Mirror: Refracted Visions of Ourselves by James Hollis explores the need to know ourselves more deeply, and the many obstacles that stand in our way. The various chapters illustrate internal obstacles such as intimidation by the magnitude of the project, the readiness to avoid the hard work, and gnawing self-doubt, but also provide tools to strengthen consciousness to take these obstacles on. Additional essays address living in haunted houses, the necessity of failure, and the gift and limits of therapy.
 

C.G. Jung as Artisan: Cross Connections with India, Considerations in Times of Crisis
 
C.G. Jung as Artisan: Cross Connections with India, Considerations in Times of Crisis is a richly illustrated, carefully interwoven tapestry of cosmological cycles with depths of travelling, trade, and commercial significance through geographical history and politics, and the spread of philosophical, religious, and scientific ideas, personally engaged. 
 
The author’s life-long engagement with aspects of India started with her birth there in pre-Independence days. Jung’s short but extensive 1937–38 journey to India was on behalf of the Silver Jubilee of the Indian Science Congress Association in conjunction with the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

Haunted – the Death Mother Archetype
The disturbing experience of psychological infanticide reflects the darkest aspect of the wounding of the Sacred Feminine – the Death Mother archetype that annihilates rather than nurtures life. Through myth, story, classic literature, biography, poems, art and dreams, Dr. Violet Sherwood weaves together symbolic aspects of psychological infanticide with psychoanalytic theory of traumatic attachment and the literal truth of a centuries-old history of infanticide. 

The God-Image: From Antiquity to Jung

 

This book describes the development of images of God, beginning in antiquity and culminating in Jung’s notion of the Self, an image of God in the psyche that Jung calls the God within. Over the course of history, the Self has been projected onto many local gods and goddesses and given different names and attributes. These deities are typically imagined as existing in a heavenly realm, but Jung’s approach recalls them to their origins in the objective psyche.

There You Are – Marion Woodman: 
Biography of a Friendship

How deep can a friendship go?

Jill Mellick explores the grace, challenges, and gifts of an unexpected, instantly deep friendship with Marion Woodman. She documents with letters, calls, journals, memories, and photographs.

Timeless moments—singing, dancing, opening arms to storms, holding public events or retreats by the Pacific and on an island in Georgian Bay, home stays, creating words and music together—unfold. Across decades, they exchange letters about external and internal journeys. Their friendship and love endure, together, apart, through harrowing, life-threatening illnesses each; Mellick even secures Woodman a second opinion, which saves her life.

Whispers of the Soul: New and Selected Poems
 

WHISPERS OF THE SOUL
…SOMETIMES GENTLE
…SOMETIMES FIERCE

A collection of poems that range from expressions of gratitude for the gifts of nature, to musings about aging and the fragility of life, to insights about women’s issues and concerns, to observations about the complexities of family dynamics, to reflections about writing and therapy.

Online Seminar from Pacifica on The Collected Works Of Marie-Louise Von Franz:  Fairytales, Visions, and the Afterlife

6 Week Online Seminar from Pacifica –
Includes new material never published in English
 
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MARIE-LOUISE VON FRANZ: 
FAIRYTALES, VISIONS, AND THE AFTERLIFE
 
with Dr. Steven Buser and the Pacifica Graduate Institute
 
February 17, 24; March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2022 (Thursdays)
2-4 p.m. (Pacific Time) via Zoom
 
Areas covered in the course will include:
  • An overview of von Franz’s life and work
  • A history and overview of the evolving project of her collected works.
  • A deep dive into her work on fairytales, particularly her early writings.
  • A method for the interpretation of fairytales.
  • The four primary archetypal figures in fairytales.
  • Primary male and female tetralogies.
  • The hero and heroine’s journey in fairytales.
  • The Visions of Niklaus von Flue and Perpetua.
  • The mysteries of death, life after death, and the diamond body.
 

Coming in March 
Volume 6 of the 
Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz – Niklaus Von Flüe And Saint Perpetua: A Psychological Interpretation of Their Visions
 

The Collected Works of Marie-Louise von Franz is a 28 volume Magnum Opus from one of the leading minds in Jungian Psychology. Volume 6 heralds translations of material never before available in English. It explores the profound visions of two ground-breaking saints in the Catholic church, Saint Niklaus von Flüe and Saint Perpetua.

Saint Niklaus von Flüe, the patron saint of Switzerland, was held in the highest esteem by both CG Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz. Jung even declared him the Patron Saint of Psychotherapy, due to the Saint’s deep inward reflections and profound experiences. His visions reportedly began while still in his mother’s womb and continued until his death. One of his later visions was a terrifying image of the face of God. Von Franz saw Niklaus as the shadow brother of Christ and wrote of him as the alchemical Anthropos, a universal man. His visions were an evolution of Christian mysticism.

Saint Perpetua was a young Christian woman put to death in 203 AD in the Roman arena at the age of 22. Her profound visions occurred days before her death. Von Franz penetrates these images, suggesting they were revelations of a new, Christian God-image breaking through from the collective unconscious into the animus of young Perpetua.

Marie-Louise von Franz is at her very best as she unravels the mysteries held within the visions of these two saints.

Note: Volumes 4 and 5 are currently in production and we look forward to the releases when translations are complete.

Volume 3 
The Maiden’s Quest

Volume 3 turns to the Maiden’s Quest within fairytales.

The maiden/heroine navigates a complicated maze of inner and outer relationships as she builds a bridge to the unconscious. The heroine contends with the animus in many forms like a devouring and incestuous father, demonic groom, the beautiful prince, an androgenous mother, a cold dark tower, and through conflict with the evil stepmother.

Dangers and pitfalls await her as the conscious feminine strives to make connections with the unconscious masculine. The maiden is the undeveloped feminine and the promised fruit of her struggle with the animus is the coniunctio. Volume 3 is a masterwork of cross-cultural scholarship, penetrating psychological insight, and a strikingly illuminating treatise. With her usual perspicacity and thoroughness, von Franz gathers countless fairytale motifs revealing a myriad of facets to the maiden’s quest.

Volume 2 – 
The Hero’s Journey
 
Volume 2 – The Hero’s Journey is about the great adventure that leads to a cherished and difficult to obtain prize. In these fairytales, the Self is often symbolized as that treasured prize and the hero’s travails symbolize the process of individuation. In its many manifestations, the hero embodies the emerging personality. “In the conscious world, the hero is only one part of the personality—the despised part—and through his attachment to the Self in the unconscious is a symbol of the whole personality.”

Von Franz’s prodigious knowledge of fairytales from around the world demonstrates that the fairytale draws its root moisture from the collective realm. This volume continues where Volume 1 left off as von Franz describes the fairytale, “suspended between the divine and the secular worlds (…) creating a mysterious and pregnant tension that requires extreme power to withstand.” The resistance of the great mother against the hero and his humble origins, as well as the hero freeing the anima figure from the clutches of the unconscious are universal archetypal patterns. The spoils retrieved by the hero symbolize new levels of consciousness wrested from the unconscious.

Volume 1 – 
The Profane and Magical Worlds
 
Volume 1 – Fairytales, like myths, provide a cultural and societal backdrop that helps the human imagination narrate the meaning of life’s events. The remarkable similarities in fairytale motifs across different lands and cultures inspired many scholars to search for the original homeland of fairytales. While peregrinations of fairytale motifs occur, the common root of fairytales is more archetypal than geographic. A striking feature of fairytales is that a sense of space, time, and causality is absent. This situates them in a magical realm, a land of the soul, where the most interesting things happen in the center of places like Heaven, mountains, lakes, and wells.